Cremation after death: for the Christian?

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"Therefore, though I might be very bold in Christ to command you what is fitting, yet for love’s sake I rather appeal to you." (Philemon 1:8,9)

I would like to explore the subject of cremation as a means of disposing of the body after death. Particularly, as a question—is it ok for a Christian believer to be cremated after one dies? Many choose cremation over the traditional method for two reasons. One, they don't believe. Or two, they don't want to spend the money on a burial.

Definition of Terms

Death: a permanent cessation of all vital functions--the end of life.

Cremate: Etymology: Latin crematus, to burn up, cremate, to reduce (as a dead body) to ashes by burning.

Burial: the act or process of burying, either by covering with earth, or in a tomb.

The Method of Cremation

The following is excerpted from USA Today, December 5, 1995.

"The three-hour process of burning a body and grinding it to small fragments often takes place away from loved ones' eyes. The body, usually dressed but stripped of all jewelry, slides into "retort"--a brick-lined oven that looks like a big bread oven.

"Pacemakers are removed because their batteries can explode at high temperatures. Silicone breast implants, which can't be removed, are creating problems for crematory operators who say remains often stick to the melting silicone.

"The gas or oil-fired ovens are heated to about 1,700 degrees. Although often called ashes, the remains are actually bone fragments. These are swept with a giant hoe-like scraper from the bottom of the retort and put in a container to cool down. Any large debris, such as dental crowns or hip prostheses, is removed.

"Everything is then ground to granule-sized pieces. The whole process takes about three hours. The result is about six pounds of remains compact enough to fit in a shoebox."

"A few years ago I stood three or so feet from a burning corpse with a missionary pastor from Singapore and his wife who were visiting us. The head was already burnt beyond recognition and the skull split open due to internal expansion from the heat of the fire. The lower legs and feet were unscorched, as they were protruding from the pile of burning wood and stubble upon which the man's body lay. The professional Hindu burners were poking the body from time to time to keep the members in the fire and were adding stubble and wood as needed. The bones were contracting and popping; the bodily organs were frying and the juices sizzling in the intense heat. My wife, a nurse with experience in a hospital in a very remote part of Asia and in an intensive care ward in the States, stood with another friend observing the ghastly sight from a distance, unwilling to come closer. The air for a hundred yards or more was filled with the unmistakable, stomach-turning stench of burning human flesh. When the fire had burnt most of the body, the ashes and remaining members were shoved into the river. This is cremation as has been practiced by heathen religions for centuries, but without the sanitization adopted in more technically advanced areas." (The Way of Life web site http://wayoflife.org/~dcloud.)

"I and a friend decided to attend the cremation…I felt a little uneasy about being there. Meditation on death, including meditation in cremation grounds, is a highly-recommended Buddhist practice. Eventually the pyre was completed, the men added incense, to mitigate the effects of the tyres. They carried the body from a low building where it had lain, removed the coffin, and hefted the corpse on the pyre. Then they gathered in a circle, and we were invited to join them. From my new vantage point I could see that the deceased was an old man, of the typically wiry Gurkha build. He was dressed in cheap clothes-none of the men looked as if they had much money. Four men took burning brands and circumambulated the body three times, then they plunged them into the damp wood. It took some time for the fire to take hold, but eventually there was a good blaze. Between mouthfuls of tea, I could watch the skull blackening, note how the flesh on the limbs was being burnt away to the bone. Ghosts from my Western Christian upbringing kept whispering to me in the wind." (Vessantara, Golden Drum 18, http://www.fwbo.org/articles/cremation_ground.html)

"…the number of cremations in North America is increasing dramatically. In 1962, fewer than 5% of the people who died were cremated. Only 30 years later, by 1992, this had increased to 20%. In Hawaii, the number is 60.6%. In Washington, 49.9%. In Nevada, 49.8%. In Alaska, 47.2%. In Montana, 45.3%." (December 5, 1995, issue of USA Today)

"The increase in cremation in North American society has paralleled the wholesale rejection of the Bible in this same society." (The Way of Life web site http://wayoflife.org/~dcloud.)

History of Cremation

"Scholars today quite generally agree that cremation probably began in any real sense during the early Stone Age -- around 3000 B.C. -- and most likely in Europe and the Near East. During the late Stone Age, cremation began to spread across northern Europe, as evidenced by particularly informative finds of decorative pottery urns in western Russia among the Slavic peoples.

With the advent of the Bronze Age -- 2500 to 1000 B.C. -- cremation moved into the British Isles and into what is now Spain and Portugal. Cemeteries for cremation developed in Hungary and northern Italy, spreading to northern Europe and even Ireland. In the Mycenaean Age -- circa 1000 B.C. -- cremation became an integral part of the elaborate Grecian burial customer. In fact, it became the dominate mode of disposition by the time of Homer in 800 B.C. and was actually encouraged for reasons of health and expedient burial of slain warriors in this battle-ravaged country.

Following this Grecian trend, the early Romans probably embraced cremation some time around 600 B.C. and it apparently became so prevalent that an official decree had to be issued in the mid 5th Century against the cremation of bodies within the city. By the time of the Roman Empire -- 27 B.C. to 395 A.D. -- it was widely practiced, and cremated remains were generally stored in elaborate urns, often within columbarium-like buildings. Prevalent though the practice was among the Romans, cremation was rare with the early Christians who considered it pagan and in the Jewish culture where traditional sepulcher entombment was preferred.

However, by 400 A.D., as a result of Constantine's Christianization of the Empire, earth burial had completely replaced cremation except for rare instances of plague or war, and for the next 1,500 years remained the accepted mode of disposition throughout Europe.

Modern cremation, as we know it, actually began only a little over a century ago, after years of experimentation into the development of a dependable chamber. When Professor Brunetti of Italy finally perfected his model and displayed in at the 1873 Vienna Exposition, the cremation movement started almost simultaneously on both sides of the Atlantic. In the British Isles, the movement was fostered by Queen Victoria's surgeon, Sir Henry Thompson. Concerned with hazardous health conditions, Sir Henry and his colleagues founded the Cremation Society of England in 1874. The first crematories in Europe were built in 1878 in Woking, England and Gotha, Germany. Meanwhile in North America, although there had been two recorded instanced of cremation before 1800, the real start began in 1876 when Dr. Julius LeMoyne built the first crematory in Washington, Pennsylvania. In 1884 the second crematory opened in Lancaster,

Pennsylvania and, as was true of many of the early crematories, it was owned and operated by a cremation society. Other forces behind early crematory openings were Protestant clergy who desired to reform burial practices and the medical profession concerned with health conditions around early cemeteries. Crematories soon sprang up in Buffalo, New York, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Detroit and Los Angeles. By 1900, there were already 20 crematories in operation, and by the time that Dr. Hugo Erichsen founded the Cremation Association of America in 1913, there were 52 crematories in North America and over 10,000 cremations took place in that year. In 1975, the name was changed to the Cremation Association of North America to be more indicative of the membership composition of the United States and Canada. At the time, there were over 425 crematories and nearly 150,000 cremation. In 1994, there were 1,100 crematories and 470,915 cremations." (The History of Cremation)

"Throughout history, different cultures have held very different views about the concept of death and how one deals with it. As time goes on, these views continually change, as do methods for treating bodies of the deceased. During the first and second centuries AD, cremation was the most common burial practice in the Roman empire. Ultimately inhumation would replace cremation; a variety of factors, including the rise of Christianity among Romans and changes in attitudes to the afterlife, would contribute to this marked shift in popular burial practices."

"Movies highlight the rich tradition of the Norse and Viking warriors and cremation, detailing a burning ship sailing off into the sunset. Although this type of funeral was reserved for those of higher station, cremation was the common mode of funerals for ancient Scandinavian tribes as early as the Middle Bronze Age. The ship burial was not unlike the Egypt belief offering the richest possessions of the dead warrior and sometimes slain slaves to help their journey in the afterlife. Vikings who were not warriors were often burned at funeral pyres and their remains then buried. These tribes went on to populate not only the Scandinavian countries but also the early Germadic tribes. Cremation continued until Christianity was introduced into Northern Europe. The reasoning behind cremation can be seen in the folklore that surrounded the tribes at that time. The folklore told of cremation as the form of burial of choice because of those who feared the dead and those who wished the spirit of the dead person to be released."

Commercialization of Cremation

"Create Eternal Life with Eternal Reefs. Turn your Loved One's Remains into a Living Coral Reef. Cremation is increasing worldwide due to cost effectiveness, low environmental impact, and the need for land conservation." (Eternal Reefs, Inc. 1066 Berkeley Road Avondale Estates, GA. 30002 Phone: (404) 966-7333 http://www.eternalreefs.com)

"Most people who choose cremation want permanent placement of their remains. Memorialization helps preserve these memories by providing a lasting expression of love and devotion. Cremation memorialization has come a long way since the days of the Roman Empire when choices were limited. Today, there is a wide selection of memorialization options available to suit personal tastes including: handcrafted urns, beautiful niches, outdoor Cremorials, distinctive columbarium estates and memorial plaques in scattering gardens." (http://www.matthewsbronze.com/histofcrema.html)

Cremation is Heathen and Unchristian

There is nothing Christian about cremation. World religions and cults practice this awful disposal of the body after death.

"To a Sikh, birth and death are closely associated, because they are both part of the cycle of human life, Ava Guvan, which is seen as transient stage towards Nirvana, complete unity with God. Sikhs thus believe in reincarnation. Mourning is therefore discouraged, especially in the case of those who have lived a long and full life. For cremation, the body is first washed and dressed with clean clothes complete with the Five K's (in case of baptised Sikhs). If the death occurs in a hospital, the body is taken home for viewing before the funeral. In Punjab, body will be burnt on the funeral pyre, but in Western countries crematorium is used. A prayer is said before the start of the funeral to seek salvation for the departed soul. On arrival at the crematorium, a brief speech about the deceased is generally given, the Sohila, bed-time prayer is recited and the Ardas, formal prayer is offered. The cremation is generally done by the eldest son or a close relative. Where cremation is not possible, disposal of the dead body by placing it in the sea or river is permitted. At the end of the cremation the member of the funeral party return to their homes. The ashes are collected after the cremation and later disposed of by immersion in the nearest river or sea. Some families, living outside India, prefer to take the ashes to Punjab." (SIKHISM, Pritam Singh,http://maple.lemoyne.edu/~arora/sikhsm.htm)

"A deity during the iron age was "Tacitus's 'Mercury' …the complex deity…Human victims sacrificed to him were dispatched by simultaneous spear-thrust and hanging, and cremation was associated with this cult." (Geoffrey Parrinder editor, World Religions, 1971, p. 106)

"In Sweden in the fifth and sixth centuries huge mounds with internal wooden chambers held buried or cremated chieftains. Ships were cremated too, and probably also set alight on the sea, as floating pyres…they signified the soul's journey to the otherworld." (Geoffrey Parrinder editor, World Religions, 1971, p. 112, 113)

For Hinduism "…cremation is the prescribed method of disposing of the dead. Afterwards the ashes may be scattered in the river [Ganges]." (Geoffrey Parrinder editor, World Religions, 1971, p.195)

"Buddhist burn bodies of the dead "Buddhist monks carry prayer-sticks to the funeral pyre of a friend." (Geoffrey Parrinder editor, World Religions, 1971, p. 289)

"A Buddhist monk in Vietnam burns himself to death in 1963 as a protest against the war being wagged there. This is an ancient custom intended to indicate faithfulness to the peaceful Buddhist tradition." (Geoffrey Parrinder editor, World Religions, 1971, p. 290)

"Many Catholics today still believe that the Church forbids cremation. This was true, for a variety of reasons, prior to Vatican II. The Judaic roots of Christian tradition carried a long-standing prohibition of cremation as a reaction to equally long-standing attempts to annihilate Jewish existence and memory…This position has now been codified in the Revised Code of Canon Law: "The Church earnestly recommends that the pious custom of burial be retained; but it does not forbid cremation, unless this is chosen for reasons which are contrary to Christian teaching."

Even the cult of Mormonism frowns on cremation

"Cremation of the dead is no part of the gospel; it is a practice that has been avoided by the saints in all ages. The Church today counsels its members not to cremate their dead. Such a procedure would find gospel acceptance only under the most extraordinary and unusual circumstances. Wherever possible the dead should be consigned to the earth, and nothing should be done that is destructive of the body; that should be left to nature, "for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return." Genesis 3:19 (Mormon Doctrine, p.172)

Why copy something as horrible as cremation? Let's not forget the horrors of the Holocaust!

"In November 1941, the Polish Government in Exile reported, based on information received from the Polish underground, that "[d]uring the winter months, the crematoria ovens have not sufficed for burning all the corpses." Consequently, the origins of the new crematoria can be traced to mass murder. Our knowledge of Auschwitz is that sometime in the spring of 1942 it became an extermination camp for most of the Jews who arrived there. On October 13, 1942 the head of the Bauleitung stated in a letter: "As regards the construction of the new crematorium buildings, it was necessary to start immediately in July 1942 because of the situation caused by the special actions." This letter clearly shows that the "special actions" were resulting in dead bodies, which needed to be cremated." (On Body Disposal at Auschwitz, John C. Zimmerman, Associate Professor University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Cremation Today

"CANA reports that the U.S. cremation rate in 1994 was nearly 21% -over 470,000 cremations that year alone. Roughly one out of five people in the United States selected cremation. The cremation rate varies in each region of the United States. For example, in New England, the cremation rate was nearly 24% in 1994 and it's projected to climb to more than 46% in 2010. In the Mid-Atlantic region, the rate was more than 16% in 1994 and it is projected to reach more than 26% in 2010. The cremation rate in the Mountain region was slightly higher than 35% in 1994. However, CANA projects that rate to rise to more than 48% in 2010. The central portion of the United States had cremation rates as low as 4% in the East South Central region to a high of 17% in the East North Central region. And CANA projects the rate to reach 9% and 30% in these respective regions in 2010. In the Pacific region, the cremation rate was 43% in 1994. This rate is expected to reach 52% in 2010. In Canada, the cremation rate is projected to rise from 36% in 1994 to 52% in 2010. The rise in cremation rates in certain geographic regions can be attributed to changes in the ethnic and cultural origins of the population. Worldwide, the Japanese cremation rate is nearly 98%. It is more than 75% in Hong Kong. 70% in Great Britain. 64% percent in Sweden. And, here in the United States, as cultural and ethnic changes occur in every state, cremation rates will continue to rise significantly." (http://www.matthewsbronze.com/histofcrema.html)

Now that we have given ample evidence of the definition, method, history, commercialization, and pagan origin and nature of cremation. We need to go to God for the final authority as to why Christians should not seek cremation as a form of body disposal after death.

God's Thoughts on it

God's faithful people have always practiced burial. Abraham (Genesis 25:8-10), Sarah (Genesis 23:1-4), Rachel (Genesis 35:19-20), Isaac (Genesis 35:29), Jacob (Genesis 49:33; 50:1-13), Joseph (Genesis 50:26), Joshua (Joshus 24:29-30), Eleazar (Joshua 24:33), Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1), David (1 Kings 2:10), John the Baptist (Matthew 14:10-12), Stephen (Acts 8:2).

"Even in difficult circumstances God's people in olden days practiced burial. For example, Joseph's body was kept for over 400 years in Egypt and then carried through the 40 years of wilderness wanderings before being buried in Palestine, the Promised Land. We read of this in Genesis 50:24-25; Exodus 13:19 and Joshua 24:32. How much simpler it would have been for the Israelites to have cremated Joseph, then carried his ashes with them in a tiny container! But this they refused to do. Joseph, a follower of the one true God, a man who looked forward to the bodily resurrection, was given an honorable burial. From this important example, we learn that even if cremation is less expensive or easier than burial, it is still to be rejected, as the Israelites rejected the economical and simpler way to carry Joseph to the Promised Land." (The Way of Life web site http://wayoflife.org/~dcloud.)

God Believes in Burial

"So Moses the servant of the LORD died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the LORD. And he[God] buried him in a valley in the land of Moab, over against Bethpeor: but no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day." (Deuteronomy 34:5,6)

"Men [and] brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day." (Acts 2:29)

"In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ: Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with [him] through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead." (Colossians 2:11,12)

The Lord Jesus was buried and he is our example.

"Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury.... There laid they Jesus therefore...." (John 19:38-42)

"He went to Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus. Then Pilate commanded the body to be delivered. And when Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth, And laid it in his own new tomb , which he had hewn out in the rock: and he rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulchre, and departed." (Matthew 27:58-60)

"Joseph of Arimathaea, an honourable counsellor, which also waited for the kingdom of God, came, and went in boldly unto Pilate, and craved the body of Jesus. And he bought fine linen, and took him down, and wrapped him in the linen, and laid him in a sepulchre which was hewn out of a rock, and rolled a stone unto the door of the sepulchre." (Mark 15:43,46)

"This [man] went unto Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus. And he took it down, and wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a sepulchre that was hewn in stone, wherein never man before was laid." (Luke 23:52,53)

"For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures." (1 Corinthians 15:3,4)

Being Buried looks to the Resurrection

"And came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many." (Matthew 27:53)

"He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption." (Acts 2:31)

"But some [man] will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come? [Thou] fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die: And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other [grain]: But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. All flesh [is] not the same flesh: but [there is] one [kind of] flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, [and] another of birds. [There are] also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial [is] one, and the [glory] of the terrestrial [is] another. [There is] one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for [one] star differeth from [another] star in glory. So also [is] the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption. It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body." (1 Corinthians 15:35-44)

God Contects it Wickedness

"And a fire was kindled in their company; the flame burned up the wicked." (Psalm 106:18)

"And he made his son pass through the fire, and observed times, and used enchantments, and dealt with familiar spirits and wizards: he wrought much wickedness in the sight of the LORD, to provoke [him] to anger." (2 Kings 21:6)

"And if a man take a wife and her mother, it [is] wickedness: they shall be burnt with fire, both he and they; that there be no wickedness among you." (Leviticus 20:14)

It is connected with punishment and Divine Wrath

"Then the LORD rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the LORD out of heaven" (Genesis 19:24)

"And Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, took either of them his censer, and put fire therein, and put incense thereon, and offered strange fire before the LORD, which he commanded them not. And there went out fire from the LORD, and devoured them, and they died before the LORD." (Leviticus 10:1,2)

"And [when] the people complained, it displeased the LORD: and the LORD heard [it]; and his anger was kindled; and the fire of the LORD burnt among them, and consumed [them that were] in the uttermost parts of the camp." (Numbers 11:1)

"And Joshua said, Why hast thou troubled us? the LORD shall trouble thee this day. And all Israel stoned him with stones, and burned them with fire, after they had stoned them with stones." (Joshua 7:25)

"And shall cast them into a furnace of fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth." (Matt. 13:42)

See also: Numbers 3:4; 21:28; 26:10; 31:10; Judges 15:6; Ex. 32:20; Deuteronomy 7:25; Numbers 16:35; 2 Kings 9:10, 34; Matthew 5:22; 18:8,9; 25:41; 2 Peter 3:7; Revelation 19:20; 20:10,15; 21:8.

Burning was for the Unfit

"Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast [with] fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof. And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire." (Exodus 12:9,10)

It was in Connection with Sin Offering

"But the flesh of the bullock, and his skin, and his dung, shalt thou burn with fire without the camp: it [is] a sin offering." (Exodus 29:14)

"And the priest shall burn them upon the altar [for] an offering made by fire unto the LORD: it [is] a trespass offering." (Leviticus 7:5)

It is in connection with Idolatry

"And I said unto them, Whosoever hath any gold, let them break [it] off. So they gave [it] me: then I cast it into the fire, and there came out this calf." (Exodus 32:24)

"And thou shalt not let any of thy seed pass through [the fire] to Molech, neither shalt thou profane the name of thy God: I [am] the LORD." (Leviticus 18:21)

"And ye shall overthrow their altars, and break their pillars, and burn their groves with fire; and ye shall hew down the graven images of their gods, and destroy the names of them out of that place." (Deuteronomy 12:3)

"Thou shalt not do so unto the LORD thy God: for every abomination to the LORD, which he hateth, have they done unto their gods; for even their sons and their daughters they have burnt in the fire to their gods." (Deuteronomy 21:31)

See also: Deuteronomy 7:5,25; 9:21; 18:10; 2 Kings 17:17,31; 21:6; 23:10; Isaiah 37:19; Jeremiah 7:31; 32:35; Ezekiel 20:26; 20:31; Micah 1:7.

It is a Heathen Practice

"But he walked in the way of the kings of Israel, yea, and made his son to pass through the fire, according to the abominations of the heathen, whom the LORD cast out from before the children of Israel." (2 Kings 16:3)

"And he made his son pass through the fire, and observed times, and used enchantments, and dealt with familiar spirits and wizards: he wrought much wickedness in the sight of the LORD, to provoke [him] to anger." (2 Kings 21:6)

"Moreover he burnt incense in the valley of the son of Hinnom, and burnt his children in the fire, after the abominations of the heathen whom the LORD had cast out before the children of Israel." (2 Chronicles 28:3)

"And they have built the high places of Tophet, which [is] in the valley of the son of Hinnom, to burn their sons and their daughters in the fire; which I commanded [them] not, neither came it into my heart." (Jeremiah 7:31)

See also: 2 Kings 17:17,31; 23:10; Jeremiah 32:35; Ezekiel 20:26,31.

Lastly, cremation of the body after death must not be sought after as a means for disposal. We have given many proofs as to the incorrectness of this choice. We're commanded by God to return to the earth, and not be burned.

"In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou [art], and unto dust shalt thou return." (Genesis 3:19)

Jesus is our supreme example.

"For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures." (1 Corinthians 15:3,4)

We're buried looking to the hope of the resurrection.

"But some [man] will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come? [Thou] fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die: And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other [grain]: But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. All flesh [is] not the same flesh: but [there is] one [kind of] flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, [and] another of birds. [There are] also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial [is] one, and the [glory] of the terrestrial [is] another. [There is] one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for [one] star differeth from [another] star in glory. So also [is] the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption. It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body." (1 Corinthians 15:35-44)

For the glory and obedience to God don't seek cremation. The reason given in this study is proof enough. It's something not to be thought of as a way of disposal of the body after death. What can you do?

1. If you have planned or are thinking of planing for cremation reconsider.

2. Exhort and encourage people to plan for funerals by burial and not by cremation.

3. Disseminate such Scriptural teaching to our children and fellow-Christians so that they too will come to the same Scriptural understanding and persuasion. Re-read some the information presented here; would you want that for yourself or a loved one? Would you want to have your body burned as it would in hell as depicted in the Bible? We cannot make the decision about our body disposal as a Christian when God already has (Genesis 3:19).

God Bless!

"And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death. 15 And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire." (Revelation 20:14,15)

Amen?

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